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2010-Astronomical Engineering by Drell-7 2010-Astronomical Engineering by Drell-7
Another in the series by Rob Caswell and myself based on the novel 2010: Odyssey Two by Arthur C. Clarke. The engine and powerplant radiators still glowing red from Leonov's prolonged maximum thrust "burn", the spacecraft rises from the almost unrecognizable Jupiter. The planet seems to be almost attacked by the self-replicating monoliths in its atmosphere.

Done in Lightwave and Photoshop.

Thanks for having a look!
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:iconabakon:
AbaKon Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Professional Writer
Stupid monoliths, wrecking a perfectly good refueling stop for fusion driven space craft.
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:icondrell-7:
Drell-7 Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Professional General Artist
Next fuel, 500 million miles!
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:iconeddievhfan1984:
eddievhfan1984 Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014
Well, don't worry. In 2061, muon-catalyzed fusion makes this less annoying. LOL
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:icon1wyrmshadow1:
1Wyrmshadow1 Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2014
'It's shrinking! IT'S SHRINKING!"
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:icondrell-7:
Drell-7 Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Professional General Artist
Yeah, kinda hard to communicate in a still, but that is the point in the story we are in, here. When the implications of whats happening hits home.
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:iconeddievhfan1984:
eddievhfan1984 Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2014
I like how you de-saturated Jupiter's colors—there was a statement made in both film and book that monoliths were dulling the colors through their atmospheric processing, right?
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:icondrell-7:
Drell-7 Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2014  Professional General Artist
Absolutely correct! I was just reading that passage last night. Glad you like it!
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:iconeddievhfan1984:
eddievhfan1984 Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2014
NP :)

I don't suppose when you get to the implosion you could do a GIF, could you?
Also, do you plan on tackling the Discovery's incandescence?
Too many questions? LOL
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:icondrell-7:
Drell-7 Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Professional General Artist
The current plan is to not do a image showing the actual detonation of Jupiter. As your question points out, the main drama of that event is the sudden action--just like a still image of the stargate sequence in 2001 would be of limited dramatic value compared to motion graphics. The tension and interest in this series has been (hopefully) more contemplative and told in the language of classical scenic composition. Instead, the ultimate image of the series will focus on the ramifications of what has gone before. I really appreciate your enthusiasm and interest in these images. Your energy has helped keep my enthusiasm and creativity up to the task of finishing.
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:iconeddievhfan1984:
eddievhfan1984 Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014
I'm glad my interest has contributed as such. :)

It would be interesting to see, though, since in the film, we only see the Discovery disappearing in a flash of light, while the book describes how the ship starts boiling away in the radiation pulse from ignition, and when the centrifuge finally seizes up from misshaping, it all flies apart in semi-fluid chunks. Makes me wish I had the 3D skills to design such a shot.
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